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It was always going to be something of a gamble: crossing the Mediterranean from Cap Ferrat on the French Riviera to the island of Corsica, a trip of some 115 miles, in an open 25-foot motorboat with no radio or compass. But to those who knew him back in the summer of 1963 such an impulsive, risky undertaking was entirely in keeping with the character of Lord Timothy Willoughby de Eresby, the 27-year-old heir to the earldom of Ancaster and its princely domains.

timde1

see: TorremolinosChic

Five years earlier Willoughby had been among a bevy of society figures arraigned in the dock at Marylebone Magistrates Court, a then illegal high stakes gaming session organised by would-be casino owner John Aspinall and his mother Lady Osborne at her Hyde Park home having been rumbled by police. ‘Show-stoppingly good-looking, totally unprincipled,’1 the debonair, complex Willoughby was part of a fast-living London scene whose cast ranged from aristocrats and beacons of bohemia (including ‘lunatic punters’ Francis Bacon and Lucian Freud2) to the criminal underworld of the Kray twins.

‘An incredibly rich wastrel who loved a bit of slumming,’2 the compelling character of pioneering parliamentarian Nancy Astor’s young grandson had already inspired ‘a landmark of art history’ and was now looking to make his own distinctive mark on London’s clubland. With its fur-lined walls and prominently positioned tank of piranhas, ‘Wips was a private members bar off Leicester Square [whose] opening night was a great success’, the architect engaged for the project by co-owner Tim Willoughby de Eresby recalled recently. ‘The following week I sent Timothy the bill for my design work, but he had already left for the south of France.’3

drumcoro2

see: Getty Images

Whence he would set out, Corsica-bound, with an associate on that day in August 1963 – and was never to be seen again. Caught out by sudden violent stormy conditions, no body would ever be found despite the officially abandoned search being continued in a plane privately chartered by his elder sister, Jane. A decade earlier Lady Jane Willoughby had been one of six maids-of-honour at the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II (far left). And just as the relatively carefree family life of the royal princess had been foreshortened by the death of her father in 1952, so the world of Lady Jane Willoughby was now abruptly upended: ‘Suddenly she was the heir, and from that moment her life was defined by her family’s possessions.’4

And such possessions!

drumview1

see: gailht / Instagram

In Scotland, the 60,000-acre Drummond Castle Estate 15 miles west of Perth, its elevated principal structures taking a back seat to what is indubitably ‘one of the major garden spectacles of Britain’ (r).5 And 340 miles south the small matter of Grimsthorpe Castle, ‘a stunning treasure house with beautiful contents, surrounded by 3,000 acres of ‘Capability’ Brown parkland’ representing roughly a quarter of the Lincolnshire estate.

Upon the death of her father the 3rd Earl of Ancaster in 1983 the family’s more ancient title now also passed to Lady Jane Heathcote-Drummond-Willoughby, the Willoughby de Eresby barony being unusually available to female heirs in their own right. As the compound full surname of the 28th baroness indicates, this was far from being the first such occurrence (having happened five times previously since 1313). It was, however, a concept wholly alien to the Drummonds, earls of Perth, synonymous with Drummond Castle from the C15 until Jacobitical rupture in 1745. The passing of ‘their’ estate to a distant female cousin (later wife of the 22nd Lord Willoughby de Eresby) in 1800 would occasion ‘much bitterness on the part of other members of the House of Drummond’.

*

It was observed at the time of Tim Willoughby’s disappearance that the family’s vast estate would be financially unscathed as the earl of Ancaster had not yet handed everything over to his son (common practice to minimise death duties). Centuries earlier, James Drummond, the 5th Earl of Perth’s seemingly premature decision so to do (his son being but months old) would prove equally fortuitous, thereby thwarting its confiscation for his subsequent role in the 1715 Jacobite rebellion.

grim1

see: si_arm77 / Instagram

1715 was also the year in which Robert Bertie, 16th Baron Willoughby de Eresby became 1st Duke of Ancaster, marking his elevation with a Baroque remodelling of the north front of Grimsthorpe Castle (r) which had been this family’s seat for two centuries. In so doing Ancaster would procure ‘the last great masterpiece’ to be built by Sir John Vanburgh and which these days can be publicly enjoyed for six months of the year.6

drumview5

see: JThomas

Conversely the mansion at Drummond has remained a private estate residence, primed at one point to be ‘the first major country house transformation in the career of Sir Charles Barry’.7 But Barry’s scheme of 1828, ‘which would have turned Drummond Castle into a Scottish Penrhyn‘, would never be executed by him.8 Instead, the house which took shape on the rocky plateau through the second half of the C19th has always had a tendency to underwhelm.

drumtent

see: RIBApix

‘A plain structure, hardly the mansion one should expect such a family to have even for a brief autumnal residence’ – a verdict9 on Drummond just prior to its final subdued Baronial makeover, whose off-centre crow-stepped gable only just staves off ‘boredom’ in the view of one present-day authority.10 ‘Small but nice’ was Queen Victoria’s diary note of the bedroom provided by her hosts during a three-day visit with Prince Albert in 1842, an elaborate temporary banqueting tent being commissioned to compensate for the dining amenities in the house (r).

drumsun1

see source

drumgate1

see: Canmore

But, for four hours each year, the remains of the original Drummond Castle, the late-C15 tower house next door, are opened to visitors. This bastion would supersede Stobhall (25 miles NW) as the principal Drummond residence, later enhanced c.1630 with the addition of a gatehouse (left) by John Mylne, master-mason to Charles I. Mylne would also be responsible for the complex 12-ft obelisk sundial which, with its 76 faces, remains pivotal to the spectacular 12-acre terrace garden. ‘Old Drummond Castle was well battered by Cromwell’ after the Civil War but the good times gradually returned for the Drummonds following the Restoration, reaching a zenith during the ill-fated reign of James II (1685-8).11

drumview1

see: Countrysportscotland

Made Chancellor and Secretary of State respectively, James Drummond, 4th earl of Perth, and his brother John (created Earl of Melfort) were ‘soon effectively in charge of governance within Scotland’. Perth and his son would develop a new residence on the plateau, ‘the nucleus of the present house’, including a Catholic chapel room ‘of the highest quality of design’ by James Smith. Alas, this feature would be lost along with the cultured Perth’s sizeable art collection when Parliamentary forces of the anti-Catholic interim government occupied the Castle in the wake of King James’ flight into French exile.12

After several years under arrest (during which he would be created ‘Duke of Perth’ by the emasculated monarch), Drummond was released on condition he too left for France, where he died. His son meanwhile had been able to return to salvage the family estate which he presciently consigned to his infant son two years before active involvement in the 1715 Jacobite rebellion. But this James, titular 3rd duke, would be unable to pull off the same trick as his father before taking up cudgels in the uprising of ’45, dying unmarried aboard a frigate bound for France following the rout at Culloden. After a century of living dangerously the Drummonds’ property was now finally attainted, their titles in abeyance.

*

drumdun

see: Savills

Several weeks ago the sale was completed of a 17-acre Perthshire plot, formerly the site of the mansion and “lost garden” of Dunira House (r). Lying some nine miles north-west of Drummond Castle. Dunira was among the possessions of the earls of Perth and its amenities would subsequently be enjoyed by Henry Dundas (1742-1811) on lease from the Commissioners of Forfeited Estates.

By 1784 Dundas was a considerable power in the land, number two to Prime Minister William Pitt and ‘virtually minister for Scotland’. Curiously, that year would see both the passing of the Disannexing Act and Dundas obtaining Dunira: ‘[His] acquisition of this delightful place seems to have been bound up with the Drummond family’s indebtedness to him, and with the restoration of forfeited estates which he was instrumental in effecting.’13

In determining the destiny of the Drummond estate the Court of Session upheld the claim of one Capt. James Drummond (formerly Lundin), a great-grandson of the 1st Earl of Melfort via his first marriage. The swiftness of this arbitration had rather blindsided Melfort’s descendants exiled in France. Through their ‘seclusion and utter ignorance .. a person representing himself to be the Honourable James Drummond, supported by a very powerful patron, had no person capable to rebut his pretensions’, they were to argue, in vain. (Other claims persist to this day.)

drummain2

see source

Almost immediately, this James Drummond ’employed John Steven to remodel the L-shaped mansion house’, the double-pile main range receiving a bow extension overlooking the gardens.10 Three years before his death in 1800 Drummond was ennobled as the first Baron Perth – the first and the last since he left only a daughter, Clementina, to whom all now passed and who, seven years on, would marry the 22nd Baron Willoughby de Eresby.

This last development reinvigorated the French exiles who now argued that historically the Drummond inheritance was restricted to heirs male. ‘In 1807 the Duc de Melfort was forced out of Scotland, put on board a packet sailing for Lisbon by police, very powerful interest having been employed to get him out of the way,’ stated his nephew George Drummond (who would finally be granted the abeyant earldom of Perth in 1853 but fail in his own claim on the Drummond estates fifteen years later).

drumair

see: Canmore

Lord and Lady Willoughby reinstated the Drummond Castle garden in the famous form seen today, landscape architect and long-time estate factor Lewis Kennedy taking forward designs (incorporating the Scottish saltire and the family colours) developed in conjunction with architect Charles Barry.

drumview4

see: Cubo et excubo

Their son Alberic died unmarried in 1870 being succeeded by his sister, Lady Clementina Heathcote (later Heathcote-Drummond-Willoughby by Royal Licence 1872) as 24th baroness in her own right. Ten years before her death in 1888 G T Ewing was enlisted ‘to remodel the mansion to something of the appearance of a C17 laird’s house’.10 Gilbert, her son and heir, was created 1st Earl of Ancaster, a title which would effectively disappear along with his great-grandson Timothy in 1963.

*

Since her succession to the ancient barony of Willoughby de Eresby in 1983 Lady Jane Willoughby has featured regularly in the Sunday Times Rich List as among the wealthiest women in the land. Technically, however, since 1978 the entire estate has been in the ownership of a charitable trust established by the 3rd Earl of Ancaster and his daughter for ‘the preseveration and enhancement, for the public benefit, of Grimsthorpe Castle and Drummond Castle’. The baroness is one of eight present trustees.

‘In general, one of two preconditions needs to exist for a family to set up a substantial charitable fund to maintain and open a house. One is that the family’s assets are large enough to endow the house adequately without significantly reducing the family’s economic position.’14

drumbacon2

see source

The Rich List of 2007 attributed a figure of £49m to Baroness Willoughby de Eresby. In that same year a single painting by British artist Francis Bacon came onto the market for the first time, realising $52.6m at Sotheby’s, New York. Study from Innocent X had been created in 1962, the year in which another work, Two Figures, 1953 – ‘one of Bacon’s most remarked upon, seldom seen paintings’15 – was shown at the Tate, its only public display in Britain to date. Also known as ‘The Buggers’, this picture (r) hung for many years in the home of Bacon’s great friend and rival, the late Lucian Freud, but has since returned to hang in the bedroom of its actual owner, Lady Jane Willoughby.

IMG_0109

A Design: The Garden at Drummond from Higher Ground  © June Andrews

‘For more than half a century Jane had been Freud’s most loyal patron, supporter, friend, lover, muse and soulmate. Lucian used to stay with her at her baronial home in Perthshire and supported her plans to build up an astonishing collection of works by modern British artists: Bacon, Auerbach, Michael Andrews (left), and the greatest collection of Freud’s own work [in private hands]. There are plans to use part of her house as an extraordinary museum for the works of Freud and his circle.’4

‘The alternative precondition for a family to set up a charitable fund to maintain a house is the impending extinction of the family, or its direct line.’14

drumjane

see: Hannah Rothschild

Baroness Willoughby de Eresby, now 82, has never married or had children. (While Lucian Freud would father fourteen acknowledged children by six different women, Lady Jane (r) remained unwavering in her support.) Among the current board members of the Grimsthorpe and Drummond Castle Trust is the baroness’s first cousin once removed, one of several co-heirs. And, of course, who ultimately succeeds to the 700-year-old barony is of more than purely parochial interest.

For Lady Jane represents one of three families who share the oldest hereditary office in England, that of Lord Great Chamberlain. Whilst responsible for certain ceremonial duties at coronations the office holder is most commonly to be seen at the annual State Opening of Parliament, being the monarch’s representative in the Palace of Westminster. IMG_0110By virtue of an agreed rotation the Marquesses of Cholmondeley have served in this capacity throughout the time of Queen Elizabeth II. Taking over every fourth reign, all things being equal, the Lords Willoughby de Eresby will next be called upon at the coronation of King George VII…

[Drummond Castle Gardens][Listing][Full genealogy]

1. Luard, E. My life as a wife: life, liquor and what to do about other women, 2013.
2. Scala, M. Diary of a teddy boy, 2000.
3. Rykwert, J. Nightclubbing, AA files 74, 2017.
4. Grieg, G. Breakfast with Lucian: a portrait of the artist, 2013.
5. Hellyer, AGL. A great Scottish formal garden, Country Life, 10 Aug 1972.
6. Musson, J. Grimsthorpe Castle, Country Life, 17 Apr 2008.
7. Blissett, D. Sir Charles Barry: A reassessment of his travels & early career [thesis], 1983.
8. Lindsay, M. Castles of Scotland, 1986.
9. Dundee Courier, 12 July 1878.
10. Gifford, J. Buildings of Scotland: Perth and Kinross, 2007.
11. Country Life, 26 July 1902.
12. MacKechnie, D. The Earl of Perth’s chapel of 1688 at Drummond Castle, 2014.
13. McNaughton, D. Upper Strathearn: From earliest times to today, 1991.
14. Sayer, M. The disinitegration of a heritage, 1993.
15. Harrison, M. Francis Bacon: catalogue raisonné, 2016.

 

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Hoveton House, Norfolk

In February this year, one week ahead of a scheduled meeting of the planning committee of Cheshire West & Chester Council, David Cholmondeley, seventh Marquess of that ilk, wrote a letter to the council’s chief executive. It was to be the final push behind a project which he believes “will mark an important step for the future of the Cholmondeley Estate”.

hovechol

see: Peter Craine

Extending across more than seven thousand acres in the soft underbelly of north-west England, ‘the seat of the Cholmondeleys has passed down in the direct male line since the 12th century’.1 While the C19th Gothick castle (right) remains a private residence the renowned gardens nurtured by the marquess’s late mother are opened seasonally and the grounds host regular events including the popular ‘Cholmondeley Power and Speed’.

“The long-term vision of the Estate aims to deliver a thriving environment of which we can all be proud,” wrote the marquess in the course of explaining that what this environment really needs now is .. Twiggles. Twiggles and, indeed, Boggles. The planning committee of Cheshire West Council having since been duly persuaded, the transformation of some unremarkable outlying acres of the Cholmondeley Castle estate into ‘the captivating and enchanting world’ of BeWILDerwood is seemingly imminent.

hovebewild3Swampy shuffled out of his house and made his way to the main platform in the Boggle village. This was the place where the Boggles had most of their feasts and Swampy could almost smell the aroma of sweetsludge pie and mudwort jelly..’

Now Boggles, nor indeed Twiggles, are not native to the north-west of England. They are set to be introduced from their only existing habitat, being several acres of marshy woodland in Norfolk, a county wherein also lies the other seat of the Marquess of Cholmondeley, palatial Houghton Hall, begun in 1721 for Sir Robert Walpole. Some forty years earlier and forty miles east an altogether more modest but today similarly Grade I listed Classical creation, Hoveton House, had been completed for one Thomas Blofeld (d.1708):

For many years justice of the peace and deputy lieutenant, once mayor and six times a representative in Parliament for the city of Norwich, in all which stations he signalized himself for his eminent zeal and unwearied diligence in promoting the interest, trade and welfare of his country, his knowledge in which was equalled by few, his integrity exceeded by none.’

Passed only by inheritance – mostly to people named Thomas – since its construction c.1680, Hoveton is today the private home of one Thomas Blofeld:

Tom was born at a very early age and mostly grew upwards after that. When he left school he embarked on a full-time career as a sausage thief. Unfortunately he was easily distracted and got caught quite often. He says he has stolen his last sausage now and is quite reformed, but all sausage thieves say that.’

hovetomB

see: Bewilderwood

Hoveton House has been described as ‘a naive, but a most lovable design’2, adjectives which might equally characterise the estate-saving wheeze developed by Tom Blofeld having been handed the reins at Hoveton a dozen years ago. With a somewhat incoherent ‘career’ hitherto (which included more than a little ‘swanning around doing nothing’3), hovebww1Blofeld (right) hit on the notion of creating a fantasy woodland kingdom populated by an imaginary community elaborated in several self-published children’s books. A kind of anti-amusement park was born, powered not by electricity and adrenalin but rather by the energy and imagination of its 2-12 year old target audience.

Eco-friendly and unashamedly old-fashioned in its appeal, BeWILDerwood was soon attracting more than 150,000 visitors annually and Blofeld and his small team had Mark II in the pipeline for National Trust/Cheshire Council-run Tatton Park until negotiations eventually hit the buffers. Enter fellow Old Etonian the Marquess of Cholmondeley as the ideal partner, being ‘a willing landowner who possesses the freehold of the whole site’.

*

This enterprising streak would doubtless be recognised by Thomas Blofeld, the builder of Hoveton House, whose fortune derived from the successful manufacture and marketing of woollen garments in partnership with his brother-in-law, Henry Negus. A Norfolk family for generations, the Blofelds had gradually inched south from coastal Cromer, steadily improving their yeoman status (via some opportune alliances) before Thomas’s acquisition of the manor of Hoveton St John in 1667.4

hovemain3

see: mikes_urban_garden

‘One of the most charming of Norfolk houses, in a beautiful and secluded setting,’5 Hoveton stands amidst the watery low-lying landscape of the Norfolk Broads, formed from the flooded peat pits of the early Middle Ages. The Blofeld property is naturally bounded on three sides by the looping river Bure which feeds Hoveton Great Broad and Hoveton Little Broad, private waters constituting a sizeable chunk of the estate’s 1,500-acre extent. In 1882 it was observed that the ‘Dutch-ness’ of the Broads was nowhere more so than at Hoveton Great Broad: ‘Homely, fat arable land right and left, and windmills all around the horizon.’6

hoverear2

see: Sam Klebanov

And this influence remains evident at Hoveton House itself, the north (present-day entrance) front featuring the Dutch gables of the smaller original house and contrasting markedly with the Classical symmetry which would envelope it. No architect has been ascribed for the late-C17 expansion of Hoveton which was rendered in tiny, one-inch orange-red local bricks, its principal south front articulated by stone pilasters and crowned with a steep pediment.

Above the original doorway (see below) ‘a fancy pediment with a lot of not very disciplined vegetable carving’2 also displays the arms of the Blofeld and Negus families both of which, despite Thomas and Elizabeth remaining childless, would continue to be represented in the next generation at Hoveton. For the estate was settled upon Thomas’s great-nephew, Thomas (2), who in time would marry Elizabeth’s great-niece, Sarah Negus.

‘Both externally and internally Hoveton House has been remarkably little altered through the ages.’5

hovemantel

see: Leslie Felperin

hovedoor

see: Ramon Wardale

But Thomas and Sarah would be responsible for moving the main door one bay along and enhancing the interiors with some ‘attractive mid-C18’ decorative mantels in the drawing room and dining room (r).7

The dining room perhaps still also contains portraits of this couple which hung there along with those of earlier generations in the time of the present owner’s grandparents (who would themselves expand Hoveton’s collection with canny purchases at country house sales): ‘We try to fit the ancestors in wherever we can as they did so much for Hoveton; not great works of art but amusing portraits of real people.’8

hoveair

see: Bing Maps

Shortly before his death in 1766 Thomas enjoyed the “wonderful divine providence” of an unexpected inheritance from a distant cousin including, in addition to a sum of money, a goodly collection of decorative items many of which still remain, and which complimented Hoveton House’s early-C18 furnishings. (To his irritation, however, Thomas would subsequently have to contend with “Phillistines who come to spy out my good fortune”.)8

While his good fortune would not extend to having a son Hoveton remained squarely in the family, only daughter Sarah having married her first cousin, John Blofeld. Their own son and heir, Thomas (3), contemplated potentially radical upheaval soon after inheriting himself in 1805, calling upon Humphrey Repton to reimagine the lie of the land. ‘Repton visited three times in 1807.’9 To this point Hoveton House had fronted directly onto a highway running east-to-west. A realignment order would see the road promptly moved north while a ha-ha now transected pastures rolling away to the south.

hoverepton

source: The Field4

‘Dotted mainly with mature oaks, this diminutive landscape survives in good condition,’9 as indeed does Repton’s Italianate vision for Hoveton House itself which for one reason or another was never executed. ‘Repton was not put out and wrote an agreeable letter suggesting that Mrs. Blofeld should make little fans of [his] ‘before and after’ drawings,’ another suggestion mercifully rejected.8

Thomas Blofeld died ten years later, his tenure as brief yet as impactful as any Hoveton squire. It was also, thanks to the couple’s spending habits (Thomas being an ‘enthusiastic collector of Old Master and English drawings’) financially draining, however. It was an indebtedness his son and grandson (Thomases 4 & 5) could in turn do little to ameliorate, both being ‘impecunious’ vicars.8 The second Reverend Blofeld’s son, Thomas (6), having followed the well-trodden family path from Eton to Cambridge, went on to combine a lengthy legal career (including 29 years as Recorder of Ipswich) with a consuming drive to balance the books at Hoveton after inheriting in 1875.

But this effort would certainly not involve exploiting the waterways on the estate to cash in on the Victorian boom in recreational use of the Norfolk Broads. ‘I wish to bear testimony to the great and growing evil caused by [passenger] steamers,’ boomed Thomas Calthorpe Blofeld in a letter to the local press,10 noting the harm which he, as the owner of several miles of river bank, had plenty of opportunity to judge. It was around this time that navigable access to Hoveton’s Broads would be fenced off, a situation which obtains to this day much to the displeasure of some.

hovebroad1

see: anouska_x

‘Hoveton Great Broad (r) is one of the largest yet most secret lakes in The Broads,’ states the website of the multi-agency project to restore this water (which has been leased to Natural England for 25 years) back to health. The awarding of several millions to this end by the National Heritage Lottery Fund and the European Union has proved controversial: ‘To use public money to repair years of neglect and still exclude boaters is a total disgrace.’ The Broads Authority admits that ‘there is no public access to the water or surrounding land [and that] this project does not provide any hope that this might improve in the future. The overriding driver is that of conservation benefit’.

hovecanal

see: British Museum

As, in its way, was the disperal of a significant portion of the art collection of Thomas (3) by John (2) soon after he inherited Hoveton in 1908 (one of two Canalettos, left, ending up in the British Museum). Also responsible for ‘turning’ the house round by developing the north courtyard entrance, John Blofeld would be fatally stricken…

… by anthrax in his mid-40s obliging his 17-year-old son Thomas (7) to abandon thoughts of a medical career and embark on a remarkable six-decade stint as the squire of Hoveton. Though financially deleterious inertia would set in latterly, this longevity at the helm would allow eldest son John to rise through the legal ranks, becoming a High Court judge.11 Meanwhile…

hoveblowers

see/hear: BBC

… just last month a round of applause broke out around Lord’s Cricket Ground during England’s Third Test match against the West Indies as younger son Henry Blofeld finally drew stumps as the doyen of cricket commentary after 47 years. ‘There is no doubt that the family estate at Hoveton was an enchanting place in which to have been brought up .. heaven for a small boy,’ recalled ‘Blowers’ in a memoir.12

His nephew Thomas (8) having rather successfully tapped into and monetised this nostalgic childhood enchantment through the expanding world of BeWILDerwood, the outlook for heavenly Hoveton would seem to be set fair…

hovemain1

see: Cambridge FilmWorks

[Grade I listing][BeWILDerwood]

1. Robinson, JM. A guide to the country houses of the North-West, 1991.
2. Pevsner, N., Wilson, B. The buildings of England: Norfolk: Norwich and North East, 1997.
3. Delingpole, J. Variations on a theme park, Financial Times, 5 May 2008.
4. Montgomery-Massingberd, H. Hoveton’s ten times Thomas Blofeld, The Field, 20 Jul 1985.
5. Winkley, G. The country houses of Norfolk, 1986.
6. Bell’s Life, 2 Dec 1882.
7. Kenworthy-Browne, J. et al. Burke’s & Savills guide to country houses: East Anglia, 1981.
8. Blofeld, Grizel. An account of the Blofeld family of Hoveton House, 1978.
9. Dallas, P., et al. Norfolk gardens and designed landscapes, 2013.
10. Norfolk News, 12 May 1894.
11. Blofeld, Henry. A thirst for life, 2000.
12. Blofeld, Henry. Squeezing the orange, 2013.

 

Emerald turf beneath my tread,
Soft gray mist around my head;
Salt the breeze, the air how sweet,
Where the Esk and Eden meet!

– Millicent von Boeselager, Songs of Solway1

At the confluence of those two grand rivers lies the Solway Firth, a wild, dynamic expanse of estuary, mudflats and marsh, its detail restlessly redrawn by the tidal ebb and flow. Entering from the north, the Esk carries cartographic significance, its meandering channel emphasised by the dashes and crosses symbolizing the border between England and Scotland.

ctownburgh

see: James Smith/Vimeo

The historic territorial skirmishes between these two nations is recalled on southerly Burgh Marsh where stands an isolated monument (r) to the Hammer of the Scots, King Edward I, marking the place of his expiry en route to another run-in with Robert the Bruce. ‘Burgh is only one of the great salt marshes of the Cumbrian Solway; the biggest and most important for wildlife is Rockcliffe Marsh’…

… a verdant swathe topped and tailed by the Esk and Eden. With vast transient populations of waders and over-wintering geese this marsh is a sanctuary of international import, its status derived in no small part from the fact Rockcliffe, ‘unlike Burgh, has always been kept a strictly private place by its owners, the Mounsey-Heyshams of Castletown House’.2

ctownair1

see: Castletown Estate

“Our USP is the inland saline lagoon. We have just had two pairs of avocet adults producing five chicks, which is a first for Cumbria,” revealed present owner Giles Mounsey-Heysham just last month…

ctownGiles1

see: Yorkshire Post

… in the course of accepting the Yorkshire Agricultural Society’s Tye Trophy for 2017, an award commending conservation measures in farming across the north of England. This is but the latest recognition for Rockcliffe Marsh, ‘the single largest expanse of saltmarsh in the Solway Coast AONB‘ and land which constitutes a significant proportion of the 4,000-acre Castletown Estate.

ctownsheep

see: Ann Lingard

The marsh has been formally ‘stinted’ – grazed by arrangement – since divisive Articles of Agreement signed in 1769 which excluded those living in the eastern half of Rockcliffe parish. Before neutral arbitration prevailed this perceived injustice looked set to be compounded by the enclosure process of 1805, the prime mover of which was Rockcliffe’s newest and biggest landowner, Robert Mounsey, of Mounsey & co., solicitors, of nearby Carlisle.

Now the saltmarshes of Solway are a by-product of evolving river flow – but what Mother Nature giveth she also taketh away. And no-one would be more sensitive to this locally than William Lowther, 2nd Earl of Lonsdale (d.1872), the owner of Burgh Marsh on the opposite bank of the Eden. In 1864, citing erosion protection, his Lordship began the construction of a brick jetty 100 yards in length. He swiftly faced court action by the Mounseys who claimed the jetty ‘would force the current to the other side of the river and wash away the plaintiff’s land’.3

ctowneden

see: Bing Maps

Years of legal proceedings ensued, Castletown’s case aided by the family firm and the Earl losing expensively at every turn. As the saga played out one irony was doubtless not lost on either party: For the rise of Mounseys from humble origins a century before to county prominence as lawyers and landowners had its roots in the benevolence of the Lowther estate.

Thirty miles south of Rockcliffe, on the bounds of vast Lowther Castle park, lies the village of Askham where Robert Mounsey’s grandfather (also Robert) was born in 1696. The following year Viscount Lonsdale endowed a grammar school on his estate where young Robert would later thrive, subsequently entering the church and serving as vicar of Ravenstonedale for several decades.

Rising from a junior position in the office of the Registrar of the Diocese of Carlisle, law proved to be the metier of Robert’s son, George, who would later establish Mounsey & co., subsequent generations developing the firm and its stranglehold on diocesan legal affairs. With his wife, Margaret, George Mounsey produced fourteen children several of whom would be placed in the care of wet nurses outside of town, third son Robert being sent a few miles north to the village of Rockcliffe.

The Mounsey family’s proliferation mirrored that of Carlisle itself at this time, the town experiencing a cotton-printing boom. By the turn of the 19th century Carlisle’s cadre of middle-class movers and shakers were ready to upgrade to the league of country gentlemen, the aspriation of Messrs Mounsey (law), Ferguson (mills) and Hodgson (banking) seemingly spurred on by the timely arrival in town of the new county surveyor for Cumberland.

ctcarlton

see: Google Maps

On the recommendation of renowned engineer/architect Thomas Telford, Peter Nicholson arrived in 1808 from Glasgow where he had recently completed Carlton Place (r), ‘the most chaste and elegant of the buildings which grace the Clyde’. An accomplished craftsman and draftsman, Nicholson’s main driver was education, his peripatetic career being something of a one-man mission to instill…

ctownPNbook1

see source

ctownPN

see: NPG

… ‘with as much perspicuity as possible’, the discipline of mathematics into the art and craft of architecture. Already author of several manuals of innovative instruction, Nicholson would leave Carlisle for London after just two years in post to continue publishing and teaching, but not before he had essayed a clutch of Classical villas to the north of the town for his aspirant clientele.

All three houses – within three or four miles of one another, their construction overseen by Nicholson’s partner, architect William Reid – were variations on a theme: two-storey, five-bay principal blocks flanked by subordinate pedimented wings. Houghton House for William Hodgson (below, left) features a ‘delightful cast-iron veranda and a beautiful little octagonal library’4

ctownhoughton

see: Historic England

ctownharker

see: Historic England

… while at the Fergusons’ Harker Lodge nearby a broad fan-light crowns a recessed entrance, the pavilions being explicitly remote.

But the largest and perhaps most successful composition of this trinity was achieved at Rockcliffe for Robert Mounsey on the land which he had acquired in 1802.

ctownmain2

see: tauck.com

That Castletown House could be described back in 1989 as ‘a remarkable early-C19th survivor .. still lived in by its original family’ is surely testament to the toll of ancestral seats over the past one hundred years.5 For, by the standard of most of the houses hitherto considered here, Grade II* listed Castletown is positively a young ‘un, but it’s an original house built on a virgin site and mercifully little-altered.

ctowneden2

see: PhotoCumbria/Instagram

Completed in 1811, ‘Castletown sits in a spectacular location’ overlooking the Eden (the attraction of which may have palled somewhat just the following year when the Mounseys’ second son, ten-year-old Robert, drowned whilst bathing in the river).

ctownmain

see: JFitzpatrick Travel

As at Houghton and Harker Lodge, the central section of the original entrance front of Castletown House stands proud of its (here two-storeyed and, in the west, bow-ended) wings. ‘The short links are canted back, which jars a little but allows the apsidal ends of the main rooms to be lit.’4

ctownhall

Country Life5

Two-column screens emphasise these apses in the dining room (below) and drawing room, the intervening hallway (featuring a decorative plasterwork ceiling) being similarly defined. An elegantly trim cantilevered staircase rises beyond.

ctownint1

Hugh Palmer/The Field (detail)10

‘Much of the furniture is of the same date as the house.’5 Externally, the portico comprises square pillars featuring locally novel incised decoration ‘characteristic of John Soane’s work at the Bank of England’ in the last years of the eighteenth century when Peter Nicholson was first in London.6

ctowndoor

see: Historic England

Either side (with flanking louvred shutters) are elongated ground floor windows, all the better to maximise the carefully selected southerly vista. However, while they might afford fine views out they do, of course, allow others to readily see in.

In a Grecian or Italian edifice, it may be essential that the entrance occupy the centre of one of the fronts; in which case, I think it equally essential that the living rooms should not be on the same front. On the contrary, we frequently see the entrance on the south front, and the drawing room or library exposed to the gaze of the servants from the carriage, whilst the windows, which should have opened upon the embellishments of a terrace or pleasure ground, look upon a sweep of glaring gravel.’

ctownrear

see: Historic England

The opinions of painter William Sawrey Gilpin who in later years would apply his aesthetic sensibilities in the role of landscape consultant. He averred that two-thirds of the houses he had seen were ‘spoiled’ by such inattention and urged reorientation wherever practicable.

ctownfromair

see: Britain From the Air

Though he died the year after Robert Mounsey, Gilpin is known to have worked at Castletown7 – the terrace above a dwarf wall is a typical motif – and may have sown the seed for the house being ‘turned round’ by Mounsey’s son 1851-2. Castletown was deepened to incorporate the inset Doric portico of the new north entrance (above).

ctownGilslandchurch

see: Google Maps

The project was overseen by architect James Stewart whom George Gill Mounsey (d.1874) also employed in the building of new churches at Rockcliffe and on family land at Gilsland Spa (r) 22 miles east on the Cumbria / Northumberland border…

… where a large hotel enterprise would also be redeveloped. This burst of building activity followed the death of three-time Carlisle mayor Mounsey’s wife, Isabella Heysham, the daughter of the town’s leading medic, Dr. John Heysham, a pioneer in the treatment of the disease-ridden local poor.

The Mounseys’ second son, George, became Mounsey-Heysham upon inheriting the estate of his uncle, James Heysham, in 1871. By the time he also came into Castletown House ten years later (his elder brother Robert dying unmarried at 52) George was well-established practicing law in London and raising a family in Kensington. His only son, also George, a soldier and solicitor in the family firm, would also be unmarried at the time of his death in 1928. Castletown now passed to Richard, the son of his eldest sister (Agnes, wife of Capt. Richard Gubbins), who had been orphaned a decade earlier and until attaining his majority enjoyed the singular guardianship of his aunt, Sybil Mounsey-Heysham.

‘A unique and vivid character of whom people would say quite matter-of-factly that she ought to have been a man,’ Sybil already had experience in teenage mentoring having previously taken a young Olave Soames – later wife of Boy Scouts founder Robert Baden-Powell, and the driving spirit of Girlguiding – under her wing. Olave ‘stayed at Castletown as often as she could’, coming to regard unconventional Sybil – ‘reputedly one of the three best duck shots in the country’ and an enthusiastic violinist – as ‘an example and an inspiration’.8

ctowncorby

see: StatelyHomeNews

Richard Gubbins-Mounsey-Heysham left three children by his second wife, Margaret Barne, at his death in 1960. The eldest daughter would marry into the Howard/Lawson family of Corby Castle (r), another Peter Nicholson house on the banks of the river Eden, some 15 miles upstream of Castletown on the other side of Carlisle. Regarded as ‘his masterpiece’, Grade I Corby has had an ill-starred recent past.9 Its sale out of the family after 400 years in 1994 led to an acrimonious courtroom saga driven by Sir John Howard-Lawson’s son and ‘heir’; the multi-millionaire industrialist purchaser would perish in a helicopter crash ten years later.

In marked contrast to such drama, for most of the past half-century Castletown has known the constant stewardship of its seventh (and longest-serving) squire, a man of many hats, and long-married to Penelope Twiston-Davies, sister of leading National Hunt racehorse trainer, Nigel. And the suggestion of continuity would be there from the outset of Giles Mounsey-Heysham’s ownership: ‘On his twenty-first birthday, in the best feudal tradition, the tenants on the estate presented him with the lodge gates to Castletown House.’10

ctowngates3

see: Google Maps

[Castletown Estate][Rockcliffe Marsh Nature Reserve]

1. nee Mounsey-Heysham, Millicent. A book of verses, 1914.
2. Ratcliffe, D. Lakeland, 2002.
3. Carlisle Journal 25 Oct 1864.
4. Hyde, M., Pevsner, N. The buildings of England: Cumbria, 2010.
5. Worsley, G. Castletown House, Cumberland, Country Life 7 Sept 1989.
6. Taylor, A. The dukeries of Carlisle, Country Life 21 Aug 1989.
7. Piebenga, S. William Sawrey Gilpin: Picturesque improver, Garden History, Vol.22, No.2, 1994.
8. Jeal, T. Baden-Powell, 1989.
9. Robinson, JM. A guide to the country houses of the North-West, 1991.
10. Montgomery-Massingberd, H. Surveying the future at Castletown, The Field 12 Jan 1985.

Completely out of the blue one autumn day in 1872 Sir Charles Rouse-Boughton, 11th baronet, was informed that he had been bequeathed an eighteenth-century mansion, Henley Hall in Shropshire (below), together with its landed estate in the will of a recently deceased neighbour, Mr. John Knight. Being already squire of his own handsome ancestral pile – Downton Hall just to the north – Sir Charles’s surprise at this turn of events was as nothing compared to that of Knight’s three appalled adult sons who quickly set about mounting a legal challenge to have the will set aside.

henleyhall

see: Imsweddings

Relaxed and somewhat nonplussed about the whole business, Sir Charles duly submitted to the process which saw a jury in the Court of Probate successfully persuaded of the proposition that Knight, labelled ‘a capricious, morose recluse’, had edged from mere eccentricity into insanity. Testimony that he ‘seldom dressed till the middle of the day’ and was ‘fond of listening to German bands’ and cruelly pranking his servants was of perhaps less significance than a landmark judgement from a generation before in convincing the jury that Knight’s legacy was indeed perverse.

For Sir Charles, the court was reminded, ‘was the descendant of a person who in 1840, in consequence of a decision of the Court of Chancery, had come into the possession of a [separate] magnificent estate which had previously belonged to the Knight family and had ever since been in the possession of the Boughtons’. (The Boughton baronetcy, meanwhile, had descended, as we shall also see, from Sir Charles’s great-grandfather via a sensational – and retrospectively dubious – murder trial and execution.)

So the Knights duly retained Henley Hall (at least for a short time before selling). But, while the Rouse-Boughton baronetcy is now extinct, the Downton Hall estate – a Grade II* house sitting at the heart of ‘5,500 acres of breathtakingly beautiful Shropshire countryside’1 – remains with Sir Charles’s descendants having passed only by inheritance and marriage down more than three centuries. Always private, the late-C20th death of the reclusive last of the direct line revealed a veritable time capsule, with exquisite rooms ‘no-one had been in for 50 years’.

*

While the Rouse-Boughton name may be that most associated with Downton Hall, it is not there now nor was it there at the beginning. In the latter part of the C17, funded by income from legal services, the Wredenhall, Pearce and Shepherd/Hall families had begun acquiring parcels of land north-east of Ludlow, separately but sometimes together. Intermarriage would further coalesce their interests. In 1726 sergeant-at-law William Hall devised his property in trust to create an inheritance for the use of his sister, Elizabeth Shepherd, who had married Wredenhall Pearce in 1722. Several generations of asset consolidation was reaching critical mass: a statement country seat was soon called for.

downton3

see: Jeremy Bolwell @ geograph

‘On a magnificent hilltop site looking eastward to Titterstone Clee,’ Pearce upgraded the house of his grandfather, Richard Wredenhall, to a fine mansion of local brick and stone quoins.2 Downton’s three-storey, nine-bay east facade with projecting wings was the work of William Smith, Jnr., and very much in keeping with the foursquare house style of the prolific Midlands practice established by his father Francis and his namesake uncle.

In 1760 the south front would undergo another signature makeover this time at the hands of local architect/engineer Thomas Farnolls Pritchard at the behest of Wredenhall Pearce’s son and heir, William Pearce Hall.

downton2

see: Sue Bremner

A narrow, pedimented entrance doorway was introduced between characteristic full-height canted bays, a demure exterior belying the exuberant delights within. For Pritchard had dug into his contacts book, most likely calling in trusty Italian stuccatore to produce the ‘magnificent mid-C18th interiors [which remain] largely intact’.2

One young American visitor to Downton, writing home to her family a century on, was suitably impressed with their achievements: ‘Lunch was served in a very fine room…

downsaloon3

see source

downsaloon2

Country Life7

… they say altogether more beautifully embellished than any other dining room in the area. Some admirable portraits are inserted into the walls, and around them are white plaster frames in relievo corresponding to other ornamental work. The whole produces a beautiful, and to me novel, effect.’

downstair

Country Life

downsaloon1

Country Life

Bigger and better yet is the saloon where, beneath ‘a large ceiling oval encircled by a vine wreath’2, hand-carved ‘trophies of the chase and music appear, united to pendants of flowers and oak-leaf festoons’.3 This decoration continues in the passage and also adorns the stair.

Now with sufficient means any amount of finery might be acquired; improved social status was generally harder to come by. However, in the same year that Pritchard had been contracted to enhance Downton, another country seat some 75 miles east in Warwickshire had welcomed the arrival of a son and heir to a venerable estate and a baronetcy created in 1641. It was a title soon destined for Downton Hall as a consequence of the controversial premature demise of Sir Theodosius Boughton, 7th Bt., in 1781.

lawfordhall

see source

Twenty-year-old Theodosius lived at Lawford Hall (r), near Rugby, with his mother, sister and brother-in-law Capt. John Donellan. The young baronet’s somewhat feckless, impulsive nature did not augur well for the family fortune of which he would shortly be master. Just months before he attained his majority an ailing Theodosius was administered a draught, ostensibly medicinal, by his mother. Two days later he was dead.

Days of fevered speculation about the cause of the young Sir’s death prompted a public exhumation and autopsy in the churchyard at Newbold-on-Avon, traditional resting place of the Boughton line. Certain cadaverous odours, combined with the reportedly suspicious behaviour of Donellan (whose wife now stood to benefit) led to the latter’s arraignment at Warwick Crown Court before notorious ‘hanging’ judge, Justice Buller. Though the evidence against Boughton’s brother-in-law was entirely circumstantial, judge and jury lost little time in finding Donellan guilty of murder by poisoning and he was hanged within days, protesting his innocence to the end.

Meanwhile, over in Herefordshire, one particular gentleman could not disguise his delight at the turn of events. “Wonderful news,” wrote Edward Boughton, a distant relative of the ‘victim’ upondowntonaaroom2 learning that he, as eldest surviving great-grandson of the 4th baronet, now assumed the title. (This whole affair would be recounted at Downton, left, in a 2010 edition of the BBC celebrity genealogy series Who Do You Think You Are?)

Sir Edward – lamented as ‘indolent’ by his mother yet whose memorial records a man ‘of inviolable honour and integrity’ – died in 1794, unmarried but the father of several daughters by a maid-servant, to the eldest of whom he left the family’s Poston Court estate. His brother Charles, though slighted by this act, duly became the ninth baronet and was hardly destitute having already married Catherine, only daughter and sole heiress of William Pearce Hall of Downton Hall.

*

I now consider myself bound in Honour, as well as urged by Affection, to declare that my Inclination, my Attachment, my high Opinion of your Merits remain unaltered.’

downtonaaChasA somewhat stilted declaration from Charles Boughton whose object was not, on this occasion, Catherine Pearce of Downton but his first love, Charlotte Clavering whom Charles had encountered during thirteen years at the anvil of empire in India. Theirs would be a protracted, long-distance relationship complicated by the influence of variously-motivated third parties. Ultimately rebuffed upon his return to England the thwarted suitor soon entered parliament as Charles Boughton-Rouse, MP for Evesham (having previously inherited the Worcestershire estate of Rous Lench from a distant cousin, Thomas Phillips-Rouse).

I have a clear £1,500 a year to spend. Debts I have none. Even the expenses of my late Election are completely satisfied. I shall wait with the most anxious impatience to learn that the Alliance I propose is favoured with your approbation.”

downtonladyrb

see source

All of which was music to the ears of William Pearce Hall, by this time a man with debts aplenty who would gladly hand over not just his daughter Catherine – Boughton-Rouse’s new object of desire (captured, left, in a full-length portrait of 1785 by George Romney) – but also his Downton Hall estate as swiftly as matters could be arranged.4 Having reasserted his family name on inheriting the Boughton baronetcy after the death of his brother in 1794, Sir Charles Rouse-Boughton died in 1821 leaving three daughters and a son William who, rather extraordinarily, managed to pull off the same trick as his father in marrying a ‘Downton’ heiress, albeit inadvertently.

downtoncastle

see: Stonebrook Publishing

Eight miles south-west of Downton Hall, over the border into Herefordshire, stands Downton Castle (r), the singular Picturesque creation of aesthete Richard Payne Knight. Oddly, having invested so thoroughly, Payne Knight tired of his romantic project soon after its completion, entrusting the Castle to his brother Thomas Andrew Knight and thereafter, apparently, to his heirs male. Alas, Thomas Knight’s son would die in a shooting accident in 1827, three years after the marriage of his youngest sister Charlotte to Sir William Rouse-Boughton.

A two-year legal case followed Thomas Knight’s death in 1838, a male member of the extended Knight family contesting Sir William’s claim that Thomas’s property could indeed now flow to his daughter. Unsuccessfully, as it turned out, a ruling which would see Downton Hall and Downton Castle, and all the land between, united in the same direct ownership for the next sixteen years. (The landmark judgement in Knight vs Knight ‘is still applied by the courts today in order to determine the validity of a trust’.)

downview

see: Historic England

It was an expanded empire of which the court victor became excessively proud, as the aforementioned young American visitor discovered in the course of a personal tour of the estate in 1852. Her party were taken on rail carriages deep into the candlelit quarries beneath Clee Hill (which had been initiated with the proviso ‘that the workings shall not be visible from Downton Hall’): ‘The whole work we were expected to consider very wonderful – and so it was.’

But its seems a little of the 10th baronet – ‘a large, stout, red-faced, white-haired gouty old gentleman’ – went a long way. ‘At dinner I sat on Sir William’s right. He talked enough for a dozen, and I was frightened at my proximity to him, for his great object is to pump everyone to see how little they know and show how much he knows. I must admit that I think Sir William a humbug and a great tyrant.’

downpark

see: cloud9photography

A dim view of the squire could not dent an admiration for the attractions of Downton Hall, however: ‘[From] an exquisitely picturesque gate and lodge you gradually ascend a range of hills through an avenue two miles long. How can I convey the glorious scene which breaks upon you as you approach the house..the beautiful vision of the valley beneath.’ (That south lodge is just one of three including in the west ‘an untouched example () of that composite Jacobean-Gothick which flourished in the West Midlands in the 1760s: provincial, unscholarly, picturesque and paper thin’.5)

downlodge

see: Google Maps

In the year of Sir William’s marriage to Charlotte Knight (a precocious horticulturalist recognized for creating ‘one of the greatest cherries we have’) local architect Edward Haycock was commissioned to design a new entrance on the west side of Downton Hall (). Executed in trademark Greek Revival style, a one-storey colonnade precedes a ‘circular vestibule, shallow-domed and top-lit with Ionic columns carrying a continuous entablature’.2

downtonaagreek

BBC/Who Do You Think You Are?

In ponderous Victorian fashion, a stone balustrade incorporating the family motto in latin would be introduced atop the south and east elevations by their son, Sir Charles, 11th Bt. (d.1906), during the course of his fifty-year tenure as squire of Downton. (Downton Castle, meanwhile, had passed to his younger brother, Andrew Rouse-Boughton-Knight, descending in that line until finally being sold in 1979.)

downtonhunt1

see: Equipix

Equine pursuits would come to dominate affairs on the estate through the twentieth century. ‘Downton Hall is one of those homes that exudes fox-hunting,’ Major Sir Edward Rouse-Boughton (d. 1963) having established the North Ludlow here between the wars. This pack was later amalgamated with the Ludlow Hunt of which Lady Rouse-Boughton and their only child, Mary, would be joint-masters between 1952 and 1973.6

Though given a coming out ball at Claridge’s in the debs’ season of 1935, and a society wedding bridesmaid at least twice, the last baronet’s daughter would never marry. ‘After her mother’s death [in 1976] Miss Mary lived all alone in a single room of the lovely red-brick Georgian house. The other rooms, kept so tightly shuttered that their plastered and gilded walls are amazingly well preserved, are a time-warp back to another, more gracious age.’7

downpig

see: MERL

Mary Rouse-Boughton died in 1991. In the stable tack room a two-bar electric fire had been left on continuously for twenty years ‘in case Miss Mary’s saddles should get damp’.7 To meet death duties the Romney portrait (above) of Catherine, Lady Rouse-Boughton – ‘the finest and most valuable of that richly furnished house’s treasures’8 – was given to the nation and hangs here. (The whereabouts of another portrait also commissioned by her husband Sir Charles of his prize pig is not known.)

downton1

see: Audra Jervis

The entire Downton Hall estate was bequeathed to Mary’s great-nephew Michael ‘Micky’ Wiggin who, having ‘no idea what to do with it’, promptly invited three-time Grand National-winning racehorse trainer Capt. Tim Forster to relocate his stables there. This arrangement continues today under their respective successors, the present owner of Downton being also regional partner at a high-end estate agency yet whose own house has, ironically, never itself been sold…

[Archives]

1. Sunday Times, 10 March 1996.
2. Newman, J., Pevsner, N. The buildings of England: Shropshire, 2006.
3. Ayscough, A., Jourdain, M. Country house baroque, 1941.
4. Fielding, M. The indissoluble knot? Public and private representations of men and marriage 1770-1830, thesis, 2012.
5. Mowl, T., Earnshaw, B. Trumpet at a distant gate, 1985.
6. Country Life, 26 February 1976.
7. Daily Telegraph, 6 January 1995.
8. Tipping, H.A. Country Life, 21 July 1917.
See also:
Reid, P. Burke’s & Savills guide to country houses, Vol.II, 1980.
Ionides, J. Thomas Farnolls Pritchard of Shrewsbury, 1999.
Ionides, J., Howell, P. The old houses of Shropshire in the C19th: the watercolour albums of Frances Stackhouse Acton, 2006.

The Reverend Edmund Luttrell Stuart died in 1869 aged 71 having been for many years rector of the tiny rural parish of Winterbourne Houghton in deepest Dorset. In marked contrast to this outwardly modest existence – ‘a country parson, holding a living of 158 pounds a year’1 – not one, not two but all three of his sons would succeed to an earldom dating from 1562, sundry other titles, and houses and acres galore some six hundred miles north. It was a family destiny altered by the failing of an aristocratic direct line described as ‘almost without parallel in the British Peerage’.2

morayearl

The good reverend’s own father Archibald Stuart had in fact missed out on the very same inheritance only by a matter of minutes, his twin brother Francis eventually succeeding as the 10th Earl of Moray in 1810. By such twists of birth – and one particular generation’s spectacular lack thereof – 50-year-old John Douglas Stuart (r) stands today ennobled as the 21st Earl of Moray, Lord Abernethy, Lord Strathdearn, Lord Doune, Lord St. Colme and Baron Stuart of Castle Stuart. When the 17th earl died in 1930 he could boast almost as many country houses as he had titles. Some have since been repurposed or sold but the Moray property portfolio remains considerable including two wholly private mansions which lie at the heart of estates held by this family over many centuries.

darnview

see: Colin Mathieson

Foremost historically has been the remote fastness of Darnaway Castle, still today enveloped by ‘an extent of woodland which as surrounding the residence of any gentleman in Scotland is, perhaps, unexampled‘. The most renowned element of this Grade A house is its medieval Great Hall featuring, a full ninety feet above the ground, ‘the earliest surviving roof of its type in Britain’. Known also as Randolph’s Hall, this space – ‘said to be capable of holding 1,000 men-at-arms’ – is the last remnant of an embattled past, the earldom of Moray and its concomitant estates having long been a prize worth fighting for.

*

greathall1

see: Canmore

In the tumultuous turf warfare of Scotland’s early history the earldom of Moray was a strategic reward which frequently reverted to the gift of the Crown. It was first created by King Robert the Bruce for his nephew and ally Thomas Randolph in 1312. However, dendochronology dates the hammer-beam roof (left) of Darnaway’s Great Hall to 1387 by which time the title and its attendant property had been freshly bestowed upon Randolph’s grandson, John Dunbar (d. 1391).

By the mid-C16 the earldom was held by George Gordon, already the 4th Earl of Huntly. But the machinations of Mary, Queen of Scots would initiate the present Moray line in 1562 when she relieved Gordon of his second title in favour of her half-brother, James Stewart, one of the many illegitimate sons of King James V of Scotland. This (fifth) iteration of the Moray earldom has endured despite the most inauspicious of beginnings, earls one and two both being sensationally murdered.

1stearlofmoray

c.1561 (@Darnaway; see source)

An ambitious man ‘blighted by bastardy’, James Stewart’s loyalty to his half-sister was tested to breaking point by Mary’s car-crash marriages after the tragic loss of her first husband, Francis, Dauphin of France.3 One month on from her forced abdication, in August 1567 Stewart would be declared Regent – de facto King – in the stead of Mary’s one-year-old son, James. The Earl of Moray’s ‘reign’ was not wildly popular but his regard soared almost overnight when on January 21, 1570 he gained the unwelcome distinction of becoming the first recorded victim of assassination by gunshot.

dounecastle

see: Historic Scotland

Violent death would also be the popular making of Stewart’s successor, his son-in-law James Stuart who ‘on his marriage acquired in some way which has never been made clear the dignity of Earl of Moray’.4 The marriage in 1581 of his 13-year-old son to the 15-year-old daughter of ‘the Good Regent’ had been a personal coup for another James Stuart, the master of Doune Castle (r) in Perthshire (who would be ennobled as Lord Doune the same year). Alas, the 2nd Earl of Moray was exasperatingly different from his canny father: ‘The advancement he reveled in, the constraints of marriage he ignored.’3 Though fathering five children, Moray routinely neglected his wife and the Darnaway estate in favour of familiar territory at Doune almost 150 miles south.

dounelodge

see: James Innes & Son

Although ruinous from the turn of the eighteenth century, Doune Castle remained the possession of the earls of Moray until the 1980s and is today managed as a heritage attraction by Historic Scotland. But the Moray Estate still includes the Doune Park estate of more than 12,000 acres, with extensive (vestigial) gardens and an early-C19 house, Doune Lodge (left).

douneinterior

see: Peter Herbert

Developed in front of a long two-storey C18 range, the plain classical mansion with its three-bay Doric portico and ‘simple, distinctive interior’ (left) is rather upstaged by the remote stable block.5 ‘A spectacular palace for horses,’ the main facade of this quadrangular edifice with its hipped roofed pavilions and central octagonal steeple can be clearly seen from the bounds of the private parkland.6

dounegates

see: Google Maps

The standing of the wayward 2nd earl was somewhat undermined by the death of his well-born wife in 1591. Early the following year a combination of monarchical insecurity and hereditary enmity lead to Moray’s fatal ambush by the 6th Earl (later 1st Marquess) of Huntly and his cohorts at Donibristle House, his mother’s home on north shore of the Firth of Forth.

BonnieEarlofMoray

see: Sing Out!

A lifesize painting of the young earl’s disfigured cadaver (commissioned by his mother and sent to the King) now hangs behind screens in the Great Hall of Darnaway Castle having been rediscovered a century ago at Donibristle.

Remarkably, James Stuart, son and heir of ‘the Bonnie Earl‘ would eventually wed the daughter of his father’s killer, a peace-making alliance encouraged by King James. The 3rd earl ‘was a quiet unobtrusive man, who neither courted nor attained notoriety’ (and indeed for the next one hundred years the Moray line continued relatively peaceably). But James did make his mark, not least with the building of Castle Stuart on the Moray Firth north-east of Inverness in 1625. Latterly repurposed as a hotel and championship golf course, Castle Stuart remains a significant element of the modern estate.

doni2

see: Squawking7000

doni1

see: MyInstaScotland

And, despite its grizzly association, Donibristle never fell from favour. In the early part of the C18 the 6th Earl of Moray decided to build a large new house on the site, the original L-shaped wings and grand gates of which stand today before a reconstructed main block. The earl and his next four successors were laid to rest in the contemporaneous mortuary chapel; today both buildings are surrounded by the suburbia of Dalgety Bay, a 1960s/70s ‘newtown’ development promoted by the 19th earl.

darnawaymain

see: Yale Pevsner Guides

Francis Stuart, 9th Earl of Moray would return the family focus back to Darnaway, replacing the crumbling stone tower house with the ‘huge pile of princely appearance’ which stands today.

darnawayair

see: Canmore

The mass of the 11-bay north-facing castellated main facade is interrupted by a raised entrance with Gothic windows: ‘The overall effect is undeniably imposing but achieved through uniformity rather than architectural sophistication.’7 In the south the roof of the Great Hall was preserved upon new sandstone ashlar walls centrally perpendicular to the new main block by architect Alexander Laing.

darnahall

see: BBC / YouTube

As glimpsed (but not identified) in 2014 BBC TV series The Secret History of Our Streets, ‘the interior is very fine .. with few material changes since 1812’.7 The first floor entrance hall (left) is dominated by a screen of four Corinthian pillars and a profusion of portraits from ‘one of the UK’s finest private art collections’.
Separate staircases service the east and west wings and feature, like all of Darnaway’s principal spaces, much fine decorative plasterwork. At the rear to the west a quadrant links to an eight-bay service wing (see above).

Amidst a designed landscape of some 2,800 acres and with far-reaching vistas to the coast, in its precipitous setting Darnaway has been adjudged ‘even more magnificent in point of situation than it is handsome and beautiful in structure’.

darngatesW

see: Reg Stuart

darnagates1

see: Yvonne Whyte

Long private approaches from the east and west (r) are sentineled by substantial mid-C19 lodges and ‘highly impressive contemporary gates’.7 The expansive 9th earl was also largely responsible for the present 4,500 acres of Darnaway Forest having planted well over ten million trees during his 43-year tenure.

The building of Darnaway Castle would be completed by his son Francis Stuart, 10th earl, but the latter’s most distinctive built legacy is to be found 160 miles further south.

darnfeu

see: BBC / YouTube

morayfeu2

see: BBC / YouTube

In 1782 his father had purchased the Drumsheugh Estate just outside Edinburgh which forty years on was now abutted on three sides by the expanding city. Succumbing to the commercial pressure on his own terms, Stuart and his agents planned the Moray Feu, a high-end residential development which remains the smartest quarter in Edinburgh with ‘the longest Georgian terrace in Europe’.

tornagrain

see: Ben Pentreath

While the 19th earl’s initiative at Dalgety Bay was architecturally undistinguished, in the 21st century the 21st earl has drawn some inspiration from the Moray Feu to continue the family’s urban development tradition. Earlier this year saw the first residents moving in to properties at Tornagrain, a new town planned entirely from scratch on 500 acres of Moray Estate land fifteen miles west of Darnaway Castle. Amongst a wave of landowners responding to the UK housing shortage, Tornagrain is ‘looking to the Scottish vernacular for architectural inspiration’ for its 5,000 varied housing units, a project the earl believes will occupy him for the rest of his days.

*

The 10th Earl of Moray died on the 12th of January, 1848 setting in train the remarkable sixty-year sequence which would see title and estate pass in turn to six male Stuart heirs none of whom produced a child. The earl had four sons (two each by different wives): all lived beyond sixty years of age but none would marry. They inherited successively, averaging eleven-and-a-half years under the ermine.

darnview2

see: Queensland Cyclones

While the incumbency of last of these, George, the 14th earl was, at twenty-three years, comfortably the longest, ‘his Lordship was almost personally unknown in the district where he owned large estates, but which he seldom visited. He never occupied Darnaway Castle and it was never let‘.2

At his death in 1895 the sons of the Dorset vicar mentioned at the outset – the grandsons of the 10th earl’s twin brother Archibald – were now called upon. But the drought of direct heirs continued, earls 15 and 16 both dying childless. At last, their brother Morton, upon his death in 1930, was finally able to leave all to a son. However, Francis, 18th Earl of Moray would have only daughters, his brother Archibald being duly obliged to throw up a settled family life in southern Africa for the cooler climes of northern Scotland in 1943.

darnoak

see: Earl of Moray

Since when, the son and (presently) the grandson of the 19th earl have straightforwardly succeeded to the 30,000-acre estate. Throughout its turbulent history a constant feature of the Moray inheritance has been an ancient oak estimated to be exactly synchronous with the 700-year-old title. At Darnaway, it would seem, the acorns are once again falling closer to the tree…

[Moray Estates]

1. Derry Journal, 15 July 1901.
2. Dundee Advertiser, 19 March 1895.
3. Potter, H. BloodFeud: The Stewarts and Gordons at War, 2001.
4. The Complete Peerage, Vol. IX, 1936.
5. Gifford, J., Walker, F. The buildings of Scotland: Stirling and Central, 2002.
6. Mackean, C. Stirling and the Trossachs, 1985.
7. Walker, DW, Woodworth, M. The buildings of Scotland: Aberdeenshire: North & Moray, 2015.

One Sunday last month saw a larger-than-usual annual gathering at a lonely stone monument high on the Berkshire Downs some five miles south of Wantage. Another of the many sombre centenaries presently being observed, this ceremony marked (as the memorial records) ‘the dear memory of Philip Musgrave Neeld Wroughton of Woolley Park, major, Berkshire Yeomanry, killed in action at Gaza, Palestine, April 19th 1917, aged 29’. At the head of proceedings – as he has been for the past forty-five years – was Sir Philip Wroughton, 84, great-nephew of his namesake and present squire of the Woolley Park estate, a property which has passed only by descent across 450 years.

woolleymemorial

see: Google Maps

The loss of young Major Wroughton in the Middle Eastern theatre of the Great War had been keenly felt not least because the heir to Woolley Park had been a long time coming. In December 1875 Philip Wroughton (d.1910) and his wife Evelyn had welcomed Dorothy, their first-born, into the world. She would be followed in 1877 by Muriel, with their sister Florence coming along some twenty months later. Winifred arrived in 1880, eighteen months ahead of.. Violet. One can just imagine the collective composing of features in the household at news of the arrival of the couple’s sixth child in 1884, christened Mary.

eton

see: National Trust

The ‘monotonous regularity of six daughters in succession was a rather strong order’, their father would jokingly recall at the coming-of-age of his first son (pictured, far right, at Eton with Denys Finch Hatton of Out of Africa fame) who had finally arrived in the summer of 1887.1 The irony of this sequence of events would surely not have been lost on the author of the following reminiscence of Victorian life and times hereabouts:

No one who lives at Woolley would choose to be a lady. God made the place for Wroughton men, who throw a long leg over a horse and gallop about the downs – fox or no fox – from dawn to dusk.’2

Protected as the North Wessex Downs AONB since 1972, this ‘surprisingly remote, expansive landscape in the heart of southern England’ is the site of ancient drives, formerly ovine, today distinctively equine: ‘The area is second only to Newmarket in its importance as a centre of activity for the horseracing industry.’

woolleyview

see: Pam Brophy / geograph

And amidst these gallop-strewn chalk downlands ‘Woolley Park stands high and isolated in unspoiled [150a] parkland’.3 Ninety minutes from central London, the Grade II* listed mansion ‘remains a wholly private house to which there is no public access’.

‘Beautifully undulating and finely timbered,’4 Woolley Park dominates the northern end of the parish of Chaddleworth, an area ‘which it seems clear was early enclosed, perhaps as early as the 16th century’.5 This act was possibly coincident with the arrival on the scene of one Thomas Tipping who acquired the manor of Woolley on August 20, 1566, the last occasion on which this property changed hands by sale.

Thomas’s namesake grandson had one daughter, Catherine, who in 1662 would disclaim her interest in Woolley in favour of her cousin, her uncle Bartholomew’s son John, during whose tenure a new house was erected. It was to be a generic later-C17 brick house of a form (H-plan, hipped roof with dormers) exemplified by such as Fawley Court, Buckinghamshire, which happens to lie six miles south of another house which would soon come to the family.

Ibstone1

see: Country Life

John Tipping died c. 1700, the succession of his eldest child beginning a father-to-son sequence of four Bartholomew Tippings to the end of the 18th century. The second of these (d. 1737) married the granddaughter of Sir Henry Allnut of Ibstone House (r), a relationship which would in due course see Ibstone pass, with Woolley, to the niece of bachelor Bartholomew Tipping (d. Dec 1798).

The inheritance of Mary Musgrave would prove a turning point in the destiny of Woolley Park. Ten years earlier she had married her first cousin, the Rev. Philip Wroughton; very soon after her uncle’s death the couple commissioned a modish makeover of their new abode, engaging an architect whose pedigree then held more promise than his heretofore slender portfolio.

*

Published ‘in order to display the taste and science of the English nation in its style of Architecture at the close of the 18th century’, the first volume of George Richardson’s New Vitruvius Britannicus appeared in 1802 (eighty-seven years on from Colen Campbell’s landmark forerunner). Prominent among the collected designs were houses by the Wyatt brothers, Samuel and James. In Volume Two they would be joined by nephew Jeffry who, after a lengthy apprenticeship under both, had set up independently in Mayfair in 1799. Later famed for his remodelling of Windsor Castle for George IV (and knighted as Sir Jeffry Wyatville), among Wyatt’s clients that first year were the Wroughtons of Woolley Park.

woolleyNV1

see: New Vitruvius Britannicus

Wyatt’s plans for Woolley betrayed his Neo-classical tutelage and his scheme here remains ‘remarkably intact’.6 A full-height colonnaded bow now projected from the entrance front recess, shallow-domed with an iron balustrade garlanding the new raised storey (below). In-filling at the rear was altogether more modest, a single-storey colonnaded loggia stretched between the wings (its original iron balustrade later reworked in stone).

woolleyNV4

see: New Vitruvius Britannicus

‘The most impressive internal feature is Wyatville’s spectacular staircase hall [the original entrance hall], decorated with Neo-classical motifs and lit by a lantern rising out of a dome supported on segmental arches and pendetives.’3 The cantilevered stone stair divides at a half-landing where stands a longcase clock, ‘evidently part of the original design’.6 And telling the time was apparently not this instrument’s only function: ‘Woolley is light and cheerful

and smells of pot-pourri, the scented air sprinkled every fifteen minutes by chimes from an old clock on the stairs.’2

woolleyrail1

see: Minimoves

Philip Wroughton died in 1812 being succeeded by his eldest son Bartholomew who married Mary St. Quintin eight years on. (Woolley Park may have appeared comfortably familiar to his bride whose own family home, Scampston Hall in Yorkshire, had undergone a stylistically similar makeover at much the same time.) This couple having no children, upon Bartholomew’s death in 1858 Woolley now passed to his brother Philip, hitherto happily domiciled at Ibstone House.

Philip Wroughton, in later years ‘noted for having to wear an iron collar to keep his head on, after a fall out hunting when he broke his neck’, duly disposed of the Buckinghamshire estate and moved to the old family seat. ‘He and the six children rode in cavalcade to take possession of their new home. The mama followed by road, sobbing all the way, for she was leaving her own part of the country.’2 (The family of Blanche Norris had been seated at Hughenden Manor, east of Ibstone, prior to its sale to the family of rising political force Benjamin Disraeli, with whom Wroughton had related correspondence.)

woolleymainb&w

Arriving with their sizeable brood the Wroughtons quickly felt the need for more room, hence Woolley gained large extensions north and south between 1858-1860. The periodic encouragement of a good covering of foliage is perhaps indicative of the indifferent character of these wings externally.

woolleyback

see: Historic England

Inside, ‘the large and lavish drawing room takes up the whole ground floor of the south extension, with panelling and mirrors in the French Rococco style’. Some original interior spaces were repurposed but ‘the dining room with a screen of Ionic columns remains much as Wyatville left it’.3

Having completed his enlargement of the house Philip Wroughton now turned his attention to nearby Brightwalton parish church, a small dilapidated Norman edifice which was pulled down and replaced at his own expense. (Brightwalton was one of several neighbouring manors – including Fawley, Whatcombe and Chaddleworth – which were acquired over a fifty-year period from 1787, the Woolley Park estate presently estimated to extend to some 3,300 acres.)

chancel

see: Basher Eyre

fawley

see: Oswald Bertram

The Wroughtons were responsible for other local ecclesiastical commissions: a replacement village church at Fawley (l) and a chunky chancel (r) for St. Andrew’s, Chaddleworth. Gothic-Revivalist G. E. Street, creator of the Royal Courts of Justice, was the favoured architect for this beneficent building spree.

woolleypark3

see: Bing Maps

While his impact at Woolley would be significant Philip Wroughton’s tenure was the briefest of any, dying four days after his 57th birthday in 1862. His wife would remain forty years a widow, his eldest son, also Philip, as many years the squire until his own death in 1910. Though spared the wartime loss of his long-awaited son and heir, Philip Wroughton had already suffered the violent sudden death of the youngest of his eight children.

One spring day in 1903 the Town Clerk of Wantage was taking some friends for a 4mph spin in his early automobile when he was in collision with a ‘motor-bicycle’ at a hazardous local junction. Looking beneath his vehicle the driver was horrified to recognise the stricken teenage form of fellow auto-enthusiast Christopher Wroughton of Woolley Park. As a consequence, after his brother’s demise in 1917 the Woolley estate would be held by their sister Dorothy – eldest of the six long-lived ‘legendary Wroughton girls’7 – and her husband Herbert Lavallin Puxley until their son came of age in 1930.

kirsten1

see: Local Buzz

woolleybackdetail

see: Vine&Craven

At that point Michael Lavallin Puxley assumed the surname and arms of Wroughton (carved in stone above the east facade) by Royal Licence. And it would seem – Sir Philip Wroughton having two daughters – that a similar device will be required if the name is to live on here. In 1984 the eldest (r) – these days very much hands on at Woolley – married Thomas Loyd, heir to (now owner of) the 6,000-acre Lockinge Estate immediately to the north. But, by whichever name, cometh the hour doubtless the next generation will be stepping ‘once more unto the breach‘ at Woolley Park…

woolleygates1

see: Google Maps

[Estate archives 1290-1937]

1. Reading Mercury, 19 September 1908.
2. Carbery, Lady M. Happy world: The story of a Victorian childhood, 1941.
3. Pevsner, N., Tyack, G., Bradley, S. The buildings of England: Berkshire, 2010.
4. Reading Mercury, 5 August 1876.
5. Wordie, R. (Ed.) Enclosure in Berkshire 1485-1855, 2000.
6. Linstrum, D. Sir Jeffry Wyatville, 1972.
7. The Times, 17 January 1974.
braemar1

see: ak_nako / Instagram

In 1748, having faced down a second Jacobite rebellion north of the border, the Hanoverian government leased a dilapidated, conflict-ravaged building in the Highlands to serve as a garrison against the troublesome natives. Some half-a-century later Braemar Castle (r) would be returned to its owners, the Farquharsons of Invercauld, reconstructed and relatively habitable. Today, with post-Brexit tensions threatening a twenty-first century constitutional stand-off, a British government so-minded to quell those pesky Nationalists would find the lease on Braemar already taken. A mile or so east, Invercauld House – ‘the most beautifully situated mansion on Deeside’ – is similarly spoken for.

inverview5

see: Alan Findlay / geograph

In a double first Handed on heads at last to Scotland and spotlights a model of ancestral country house sustainability where occupation by the hereditary owner is not a practical (or appealing) proposition. At the end of the nineteenth century it was remarked that ‘the Invercauld Farquharsons seem to have adapted themselves promptly to altered times’, a trait which continues into the twenty-first.

2017 marks the tenth anniversary of an ongoing community-driven initiative at Braemar Castle which has maintained the building’s fabric and seen it develop as a thriving heritage attraction. A small band of dedicated volunteers convinced the Invercauld Estate to hand over the castle on a 50-year improving lease, averting its likely sale. Since 2003 Invercauld House has also been available, the maintenance burden at the 14-bedroom pile most recently taken on by a private tenant on a similar long-term lease. While the chief of Clan Farquharson and his heirs reside principally in England the family remain possessed of their ancestral residences which lie at the heart of one of the largest private landholdings in Britain.

inverbbc

BBC/YouTube: ‘Who owns Scotland’

Before the complicating reality of the Brexit vote the nationalist-dominated Scottish Assembly had already tossed a caber into another hornets nest with its vowed intent to shake up the traditional pattern of land ownership in Scotland. Characterised as “a Mugabe-style land grab” by one peer1 (the 4th Viscount Astor, 20,000 acres), the fact of less than 500 individuals owning half of the country excited much debate (r) before the passing of the 2016 Land Reform Act, seen as a staging post in pursuit of a ‘more socially just’ state of affairs.

The omission of a statutory register of ownership disappointed some campaigners. In its submission to the consultation process the Invercauld Estate had little issue with such a thing in principal and indeed readily declares its 108,000-acre (156 sq mile) extent here (though a figure over 120,000 acres is commonly cited). The estate did, however, demur from the proposition ‘that in future land should only be owned (or a long lease taken) by individuals or by a legal entity formed in accordance with the law of a Member State of the EU’. ‘This could,’ Invercauld suggested, ‘threaten inward investment from other nationals, such as the Swiss’ – a nationality plucked, in this case, not entirely at random.

*

inverBigAl

see: Clan Farquharson USA

Capt. Alwyne Compton Farquharson, who will be 98 next month, is the 16th ‘Farquharson of Invercauld’ and clan chieftain (r), his innings in these roles now longer by some margin than any of his predecessors. He had already been laird for three years by the time he was awarded the Military Cross in 1944 (having stuck to his task though ‘wounded in a hail of shellfire during the fighting in Normandy’).

Findlay, the 1st Farquharson of Invercauld, had less luck on the battlefield having perished with thousands of compatriots at the Battle of Pinkie in 1547. Initially vassals, from the time of Robert, 5th laird of Invercauld (succeeded 1632), the Farquharsons would become substantial landowners here in their own right, and have remained so. The succession of Robert’s grandson John (9th Farquharson of Invercauld) in 1694 ushered in the greatest period of expansion and improvement of an estate which would have but two owners across the entire eighteenth century, his son James inheriting in 1750 (d. 1805).

see source

see source

In his time John Farquharson (r) would experience the violent double rupture of the Jacobite rebellions of 1715 and 1745. Though possibly less hardcore in his commitment to the cause, Farquharson was obligated to his local superior, the quixotic Earl of Mar, in actively supporting Mar’s call to arms at Braemar in September 1715. Once routed the earl fled to France, never to return. Meanwhile his lieutenant languished in Marshalsea Prison for nine months doubtless fearing the worst.

But Farquharson received a fair hearing from the king and parliament and after his release he would eventually acquire Mar’s attainted Braemar estate. Having been there, done that, John Farquharson decided to opt out of ‘the ’45’ entirely (leaving his Jacobite daughter Anne and her Hanoverian husband to fight out the conflict in microcosm, surely the mother of all domestics).

see source

see source

see source

c.1784 see source

‘A barrel-vaulted undercroft may be its oldest element,’ but details of the development of Invercauld House to this point have been subsequently obscured.2 While a relatively modest L-shaped affair – its naturally dramatic setting at this time further enhanced by radiating landscaped drives – Invercauld remained adequate for James Farquharson (r) as all but one of eleven children born to his first wife Amelia died young.

‘The mother, worn out with watching, anxiety and sorrow followed her children in 1779 leaving only the youngest, five-year-old Catherine,’ who would be thirty-one when inheriting as Invercauld’s first female laird. While Catherine may have lacked siblings her son and heir James made sure she would not want for grandchildren…

inverview3

see: Canmore

… he and wife Jane averaging a child a year between 1834 and 1845 (all of whom would reach maturity). Unsurprisingly given such a reproductive schedule Invercauld was enlarged, ‘the house becoming an extended Z-plan with north service wings, a long south elevation facing the river with Dutch gables and the SE wing, at right angles to the main block’.2

inverview2

see: Fellowship of the Thistle

But this demure appearance would be beefed up by the 13th laird ten years after he succeeded his father in 1862. ‘Piccadilly Jim’ Farquharson (below, d.1888) and his London architect John Thomas Wimperis were not exactly original in their concept for Invercauld House, however, joining in a mania…

inverJim

see: Christie’s

… for the ‘Scots Baronial’ style which had taken hold across the country by the middle of the nineteenth century. Robust yet lively compositions in granite, Ardverikie House – Invercauld’s exact contemporary some eighty mile west, familiar as the location for popular BBC series ‘Monarch of the Glen’ – exemplifies these romantic Highland confections. More locally the bar had been raised by Queen Victoria and Prince Albert’s remodelling of neighbouring Balmoral from 1852.

inverview6

source: The Builder 5 June 1875

From 1872 Invercauld House would be recast as a refined echo of its natural setting with the principal materials all sourced from the vast estate. The granite structure now revolved around a 70ft tower ‘created by heightening the existing walls of the old main block to six storeys at the intersection of the main block and its SE wing’.2

inverview7

see: Country Life

inverint1

see: Canmore

The main entrance was now relocated from the elbow of that juncture to the opposite side. ‘Its pyramidal roof adds to the wider fantastical outline busy with battlements, crow-stepped gables and pepperpot towers.’3 Within, carved pine interiors…

… compete with wall-to-wall tartan and antlers, all by now de rigeur characteristics with a purpose beyond simple lairdly oneupmanship. For such displays became a marketing tool in attracting plutocratic seasonal tenants keen to enjoy the full Highland sporting experience: from the late C19 the Farquharsons would regularly decamp to make way for blue-chip paying guests. (With extensive grouse moors, a large deer population and 24-mile stretch of the River Dee, field sports continue to underpin the estate’s viability.) In 1956 they obliged for a royal tenant, the Queen Mother, who, with the builders in at Birkhall, leased Invercauld House in order that she could ‘give her usual summer house parties for the shooting’.4

inverdress

Nat. Museums Scotland

Her Royal Highness had plainly not been put off by the aesthetic impact which had recently been made here by the presiding mistress of Invercauld. American-born Frances Lovell Oldham – ‘Frances the fabulous‘ – a former fashion editor at British Vogue and editor of Harper’s Bazaar, had married (her third husband) Capt. Alwyne Farquharson in 1949 and gleefully set about importing a fondness for outre design and bold colour schemes into the tartan traditions of Deeside.

invermyrtle

15 Oct 1927

Also in the year of his marriage Alwyne would be formally recognised as chief of the clan by the Lord Lyon King of Arms. Born the eldest son of Edward Compton of Newby Hall in Yorkshire, he had taken the Farquharson name having inherited Invercauld under the settlement of his maternal grandfather, Alexander Haldane Farquharson (r), in 1941. (Alexander had been succeeded by his eldest daughter, socialite Myrtle (far right) – a bridesmaid at the wedding of Vita Sackville West’s lover, Violet Keppel, ‘the most curious of many a Season’ – who would be killed in the London blitz that year.)

The Farquharsons alternated between Invercauld House and Braemar Castle as one or the other was let before Frances’s death in 1991. Since when the clan chief has remarried and relocated to Norfolk, returning for traditional gatherings. Having no children, the designated heir to Invercauld and effectively its present-day laird is Farquharson’s nephew, botanist Dr. Jamie Compton (Newby Hall having once again passed to a younger son).

At an event in 2014 the future lady of Invercauld, garden designer and writer Tania Compton, led a conversation with pre-eminent fellow practitioner Piet Oudolf about his recent undertakings at a rather unlikely arts complex evolving in rural Somerset. The choice of host that day was perhaps not entirely unconnected with the fact that the creators of the said Durslade gallery (complete with its Bar & Grill and boutique Farmhouse accommodation) have since 2012 been the Farquharsons’ tenants at Invercauld House.

arhwAn ability to ‘alchemise the wackiest contemporary art into vast sums of money’ through a canny combination of instinct and strategic commitment has seen this Swiss couple ranked among the most influential gallerists and dealers in the world. Last year saw the grand opening of a major 100,000-sq-ft presence in the Arts District of Los Angeles – adding to galleries in Zurich, London, New York and Somerset – the palpable expense involved being characteristically ‘natural and beside the point’.

wirthsnip

see: Braemar Buzzard June 2014

And, five years into a fifty-year lease at Invercauld House, this empathetic munificence is now flowing into upper Deeside. The venerable Fife Arms in Braemar has since been acquired and is presently undergoing a stylish transformation ahead of its rebirth as an ‘art hotel‘ in 2018. Less commercially, various local cultural and environmental initiatives are benefiting from generous support. (In light of such investment few will begrudge the indulgence of a rather more personal badge of commitment in the form of a bespoke tartan commissioned from top fashion designer Sir Paul Smith.)

clhwAt Invercauld itself the 1,400 acres of designed landscape surrounding the house are the focus of ‘a major programme of conservation, restoration and enhancement under the current tenant‘, and outsized works of art have appeared.5 Al fresco sculpture was also occasionally to be seen outside the couple’s first London gallery, in the adjacent churchyard of St. James’s, Piccadilly. Built by Sir Christopher Wren in 1676, two centuries later this church was also in need of major restoration. The work would be overseen by J. T. Wimperis, the architect of Invercauld House…

[Category A listing][Invercauld Estate]

1. The Times, 22 May 2015.
2. Sharples, J., Walker, D., Woodworth, M. The buildings of Scotland: Aberdeenshire: south, 2015.
3. Goodall, J. Stalking splendour, Country Life 13 March 2013.
4. Daily Telegraph, 25 Aug 1956.
5. Autumn visit to Invercauld gardens and policies, The Garden History Society in Scotland, 2013.